News & Announcements

Gilda Turitz Featured in ABA Arbitration Committee’s “Member Spotlight”


The Arbitration Committee of the ABA’s Dispute Resolution Section interviewed Gilda about how her start in the ADR field, her arbitration career and specialties. Read more here.

Economics Research Study Finds AAA Arbitration Faster and Less Costly Than Court


A March 2017 study by Micronomics Economic Research and Consulting has determined that arbitration by the American Arbitration Association accelerates the pace of dispute resolution compared to federal court, and describes the overall economic losses associated with the delay to trial and through appeal.

Women Arbitrators Remain Underrepresented in ADR Field


Recent surveys indicate women arbitrators range from 15% to 25%. Read more here.

CPR Issues Revised Rules for Non-Administered Arbitrations


International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR) announced on March 1, 2018 publication of its revised Rules for Non-Administered Arbitration of Domestic and International Disputes. Read more here.

AAA’s 2018 Initiatives Streamline Three Arbitrator Panels and Arbitrator Selection Processes


The American Arbitration Association has new initiatives for streamlining the use of 3 arbitrator panels and the selection of arbitrators in international cases. Read more here.

ABA Women in Dispute Resolution Directory of ADR Practitioners


The American Bar Association’s Women in Dispute Resolution Committee (WIDR), of which Gilda Turitz is Co-Chair, has published its 2017 Member Directory of ADR Practitioners, available here.

Gilda Turitz to Speak at ABA’s Women in Dispute Resolution Committee


Gilda Turitz will be speaking at the December 1, 2017 meeting of the ABA's Women in Dispute Resolution Committee (WIDR) on "Peer-Nominated ADR Organizations."

Measuring Mediation “Success:” Process Matters As Well As Results


Teamwork We often talk about a mediation being “successful” because the case settled, or conversely that it “failed” because a full settlement was not achieved and at least some parties are continuing to fight. Is a mediator successful solely by virtue of closure?